Keynotes

Keynotes

Prof. Dr. Katja Schenke-Leyland

Professor at the University Women’s Hospital at the Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, and the Director of the Natural and Medical Sciences Institute (NMI)

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Prof. Dr. Katja Schenke-Layland currently holds a dual appointment as Professor at the University Women’s Hospital at the Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, and the Director of the Natural and Medical Sciences Institute (NMI) Reutlingen, Germany. She is also the Co-Editor-in-Chief of Tissue Engineering, Part B, and an Executive Editor for Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, which is, one of the top journals in the field of advanced drug delivery. Katja is the Study Dean for Medical Technology at the University Tübingen and sits on the board of multiple journals and biomedical associations. Katja is a biologist with a main interest in stem cell, developmental and extracellular matrix biology. Her work focuses on the translation of developmental processes into clinically relevant biomaterials and regenerative therapy strategies, and the development of diagnostic tools to discover and validate therapeutic candidates and diagnose diseases.

 

Abstract

As the field of regenerative and personalized medicine matures, the need for novel enabling technologies to characterize cells and engineered constructs (i.e. cells/tissue combined with scaffolds and/or growth factors) as well as their individual components in a more insightful, quantitative and preferably non-invasive manner becomes imperative. Raman microspectroscopy is an emerging technique based on light scattering that allows assessing molecular interactions and the biochemical structure of a sample in a non-invasive manner. Specifically for tissue engineering applications, it has been proven to allow determining biochemical information on cells, tissues and/or material-cell tissue constructs without the need for labels.

Dr. med. Hannes Kenngott

senior surgeon at the Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery

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Dr. med. Hannes Kenngott (m)  is a senior surgeon at the Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery. He has been working on a large number of research projects in AR and VR and AI. He was deputy scientific secretary of the transregional research collaboration “Cognition-guided surgery”. He is also head of the new surgical building and responsible for all aspects within including new technological advances. He has published more than 100 scientific publications in international peer-reviewed journals and conferences.

Abstract:

Existing hospitals face that challenge once every 50-80 years. They have to rebuild their infrastructure since the old one is outdated and does not fit anymore into the present technological and medical state-of-the-art. At the same time nowadays there is tremendous economical, technological and political pressure on hospitals that limits their possibility to invest large amounts of money and build comprehensive concepts for the sophisticated present let alone the future. So how could a hospital management do exactly that: reinvent its building blocks in an economic way and build their new hospitals for the demanding present while being upgradeable for future concepts.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Alexander Schlaefer

Head of the Institute of Medical Technology

Alexander Schlaefer received a Diplom in computer science from Humboldt Universität in Berlin, Germany, in 2001 and a PhD in computer science from Universität zu Lübeck, Germany, in 2007. He is now a full professor at Hamburg University of Technology where he heads the Institute of Medical Technology. His research interests include robotics and navigation as well as artificial intelligence and machine learning, all with a focus on medical applications.

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